Taking the high road after messing up

We all try to do our best on-the-job and to keep errors and poor judgment to a minimum. It’s not an introvert thing, or an extrovert thing…it’s just a thing. But somewhere along the line I think some of us let our egos get in the way, forget that we’re human and mistakes happen. Often, however, it’s not as much about the mistake itself, but more about how we handle it afterwards.

I think everyone at some point has tried to cover up, or at least downplay a mistake at work. Very early on in my professional career, I was guilty of this on occasion. I quickly learned three valuable lessons: 1. Your manager and colleagues will usually respect you more for admitting your error up front and accepting responsibility for it. 2. You won’t have to live with the stress or fear of having your mistake discovered. And 3. Your mistake will almost always be discovered. I know it can be difficult admitting a mistake, so I like to take the “ripping the band-aid off” approach: painful for a couple seconds, but then it’s behind us. Taking the high road almost always wins the day. When we don’t take the high road, it only compounds the problem.

I saw this play out the other night on TV. I was watching the US Open and saw Novak Djokovic being defaulted out of the tournament for hitting a tennis ball (between points), which struck a lineswoman square in the throat. The rules clearly state that this kind of behavior results in immediate disqualification. The primary concern of course is the health of the lineswoman, who after a few tense moments was able to leave the court on her own power. Djokovic initially ran over to check on her, but then it kind of went downhill from there and his concern moved onto himself. He pleaded his case with the tournament officials, essentially arguing that the situation didn’t warrant disqualification since she didn’t have to be sent to the hospital, as well as implying that since he’s Novak Djokovic (the number one-ranked men’s player in the world), he should be allowed to continue playing. (At least that was my interpretation). After the final decision was made, he left the court and the grounds, bypassing the mandatory post-match press conference that all players have to do, regardless. He later tweeted an apology and said he’s going to take this opportunity to examine himself and improve as a person, which, in light of everything, just seemed really disingenuous.

To me, he took the low road pretty much the whole way. The mere fact that he tried to argue any case at all vs. just automatically accepting the consequences of his actions is a bad look. And he did himself no favors in the eyes of fans and his fellow players. Taking the high road would probably have allowed him to move on from this much quicker, but now it will most follow him for quite awhile and further damage his image and reputation. Granted, I was no fan of Djokovic (either on or off the court) before this incident, and sadly this further confirms my own negative view of him.

So in the end, we all make mistakes. But, taking the high road, being genuine and accepting responsibility for the mistakes we make are key to moving forward and real growth no matter what profession we happen to be in!

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