Being a non-conformist outside the comfort zone

Just the title of this blog post makes me break out into a cold sweat. Well, not really, but conformity and comfort zones have traditionally been my defaults. But, to quote Jerry Seinfeld, “sometimes the road less traveled is less traveled for a reason.” I can think of several examples in my life where this proved to be the case. One experience that comes to mind is when, a few years back, I contracted a condition called adhesive capsulitis (a.k.a. frozen shoulder), with a good deal of pain and restricted mobility that came along with it. After much online research (as I tend to do), it seemed like physical therapy was the way to go to resolve the problem. So off I went to PT, twice a week and a daily home regimen of stretching and strength exercises. My shoulder seemed to be very slowly and gradually improving, but I wanted to see what other options there were, something maybe I could do in conjunction with PT.

04 Jun 2001 --- Swimming against the tide --- Image by (C) K.TiedgeMy research turned up a lot of info about the effectiveness of acupuncture in addressing frozen shoulder. Now mind you, needles have to be my least favorite thing in the world, and I avoid them unless absolutely necessary. So it was with great trepidation and anxiety that I went for a consultation. The acupuncturist talked with me at great length that first visit, and we found a way to minimize my anxiety. After just a few more acupuncture treatments, I was noticing a significant decrease in pain and increase in mobility. When I told others about going my acupuncture experience, I was met with both positive and negative reactions. No judgments on my part, but some people just don’t believe in anything that’s not mainstream or traditional. It seemed pretty clear to me, however, that doing PT alongside acupuncture was accelerating my recovery. Fast forward to today, my shoulder is back to 100%, and even more exciting is the fact that I can swing a tennis racquet with no problem (even though my game is far from 100%)!

Being a nonconformist and taking the road less traveled can pay dividends in other parts of our lives too, including career. Earlier in my professional life, I made a cold call to a company to see what job opportunities were available, which was so out of my out of my comfort zone and so “un-introvertlike”. But I did it anyway. I found a contact number on their web site, assuming it was the HR department’s general number. I got connected to voicemail and left a message, briefly introducing myself, summarizing my background, and what I was looking for in my next job. I received a call back later that same day, and an invitation for an in-person interview. What I found out later was that I had called the Vice President of the company, who forwarded my message to the HR Manager. I had unwittingly bypassed HR and directly contacted a senior-level employee, which eventually led me to my next job.

Today, LinkedIn is one of the primary resources to help facilitate making those higher-level contacts at our target companies. Many job seekers, however, still rely exclusively on online job boards to find their next job. Incorporating some unconventional, bold, and creative approaches can help us gain an advantage in the job search. For example, joining a relevant industry association is an effective, but underutilized, way to make connections and increase knowledge (and hence our marketability) in a given field.

Incorporating creative and “out of the box” approaches, as well as leveraging the power of LinkedIn when conducting a job search is the way to go. As M. Scott Peck, the author of The Road Less Traveled, said, “If we know exactly where we’re going, exactly how to get there, and exactly what we’ll see along the way, we won’t learn anything.”

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